June 04, 2007

Bridge over...

There was obviously a traffic problem in Paris to solve by the end of the 19th century. They had to decide to build a bridge, over the Montmartre cemetery. As can be seen from my photo, the bridge was constructed in 1888.

It’s interesting to see how they have managed to adjust the bridge in order to avoid destroying any of the existing tombs.
I have put the photos from this patchwork on my other blog, "Peter - photos".

23 comments:

Shionge said...

Brilliant & intelligent architectual work to say the least....hmmm...send them over to Singapore Peter :D

Olivier said...

tres belles photos. Paris est un endroit magique et magnifique. Pour repondre à ta question sur la fete des meres, moi aussi je m'y perds, l'annee derniere j'avais feté la "fete des meres" à la meme date que les americains, ce qui avait surpris ma mere ;o)

Keshi said...

thats what I call BRILLIANCE is.

Keshi.

alice said...

Curieux mélange des genres...!

Matritensis said...

oops! if I say: rest in peace, sound ironic, isn´t it?

krystyna said...

Hi Peter!

I like your posts and beautiful photos. I had hard days last and was late here.
You write what is essential in wonderful style.
Take care!

Abraham Lincoln said...

A great idea. The bridge solved the problem those in their tombs no longer have—commuting here and there and everywhere.

Abraham Lincoln's kidney stone attack...

I rolled on the floor, puked, screamed, and passed out. When I woke up the neighbor was gone.
Brookville Daily Photo

Glenn Standish said...

I love the colours!

isabella said...

I guess the original plot buyers are not around anymore to sue the cemetery for "gross misrepresentation"...

Chuckeroon said...

I note that even in 1888 Ets Cail considered them sevles to be "ancien". ;-)

Ash said...

Thats a great idea. Beautiful images.

Cergie said...

Cela est vraiment surprenant ces chapelles sous le pont
En chine, on ne voit pas de cimetière, les défunts sont incinérés puis inhumés dans la montagne sur des versnts abruptes loin des vivants qui en ont peur

J'ai vu par deux fois des stèles sur un versant abrupte le long de la route et dans une forêt

Peter, tu as de la chance d'aller en Chine accompagné par une amie.

Emily Lin said...

the colour of it is gorgeous! The blending of purple and blue are really nice. Indeed it's "anciens". :p

Emily Lin said...

And I'm sorry for not visiting your blog this past week. I've been really busy for the part time job. But now I'm back to your blog. Missed your pictures and detailed narratives so much! :D

catherine said...

étonnant ce mélange des genres : pour le repos éternel les défunts repasseront mais en même temps ils se sentent sûrement moins seuls ....les activité shumaines sont parfois bien curieuses....

lyliane said...

J'espère que sur aucune de ces tombes n'est inscrit:" Ici repose en paix.."!!

lyliane said...

Jean François CAIL,un acteur essentiel (1804-1871) de la 1ère Révolution Industrielle.Il n'était qu'un simple chaudronnier.Ta photo me rapelle que j'ai vu ce nom sur pas mal de monuments et même près de Lille, il y a la gare de triage qui s'apelle Fives-Lille Cail.

black feline said...

it's all about preserving a piece of history...back home...they will just bulldoze any historical monuments/buildings to make wy for roads or high rise commercial buildings!

April said...

Oh, I have not seen this post because I was very busy in the last days. Will you ever forgive me, Peter?? ;-)

I have been at Montmartre several times but never on the cemetery. I think it's the one with Morrison's grave?

Aprops 'cemeteries': we have a beautiful one here, too, vey old: Melaten (from French 'malade'). I'll show some photos later.

Peter said...

april:
You are immediately forgiven (related to comments on "Peter - photos" blog with the same heading.

It's definitely worth a visit and there are number of famous persons buried here, but not Jim Morrison; he is at Père Lachaise. At Montmartre, there are also some Rheinland celebrities like Jacques Offenbach, Heinrich Heine...

It's amazing how many French words are used in your region (Napoleon again?): I remember e.g. "trottoir" from Düsseldorf.

April said...

Oh yes, Napoleon. He made the Cathedral a horse stable ;-) but on the other hand we owe him a lot. He was great in administration and laws.

My grandma used the word 'trottoir' ('Bürgersteig nowadays - which sounds equally old-fashioned) and she said 'chaiselongue' instead of 'sofa'. Everybody says 'Portemonnaie' and not 'Geldbörse'.

And the Cologners have some special words in their dialect, e.g. 'Mallörche' (maleur), an unplanned baby, or 'us dr Lamäng' (à la main) and 'Fissimatenten' (visiter ma tante) which has a funny history. But that's too much for here and now.

final_transit said...

I remember one such bridge in India too. It has some official name, but people just call it 'ghost bridge' or 'bridge of the dead' ;)

www.filmoteca.biz said...

The guy is definitely just, and there's no doubt.